A Lizzy finish

I have been so very very very very very slack in posting finished quilts this year… so I am going to spend the next couple of weeks playing catch up, just so you can see what I have been up to…. starting with this quilt…

finished quilt 2

This was a little baby quilt I made using a ton of half square triangles and lots of Lizzy House fabric.  You can find details of the block I used on my original post

quilt detail 2

I struggled to get a good photo of this quilt, but the stark lighting really highlighted the fabulous quilting that my friend and fellow Modern Domestic collegue, Michelle did.

quilt detail

The colours and prints are fun and bright and the there is just so many things to see in it – from ghosts to ducks to dinosaurs.  I love Lizzy House’s fabrics as they make every quilt you use them in just perfect.

lizzy house hst quilt

The finished quilt has already been dispatched to the local Pediatric ICU and hopefully is doing the job of providing some comfort.

Quilt Details:

Block:  10 1/2 inch Octagon block
Fabric:  Lizzy House fabric lines (Natural History, Catnap, Castle Peeps, Lovely Hunt. 1001 Peeps, Pearl Bracelets & Whisper)
Finished quilt size:  42 x 52 1/2 inches

 

Garden Snail Paper Piecing Monday

This week it is my turn on the Snail Paced Slow-along Sew-along….try saying that five times fast.  I am not usually much of a joiner with Sew alongs but I loved the pattern for this quilt – it has a bonus paper piecing pattern which I just loved….

The Sew along has been hosted by the fabulous (and incredibly busy) Gnome Angel using a wonderful pattern by Pen and  Paper Patterns.  Even though the Sew Along has been going since January, I have only just started my quilt.

snail block

This was my first snail and I am thrilled with how he looks.  I decided to use my apricot and red scraps for the shell, with no real plan for where each fabric went… I just had fun with it.

snail paper pieced shell

The shell piece I am using is paper pieced and is really simple… though the pattern also has an option to just use a solid rectangle of one fabric which is even simpler…

scrap pile

I have a decent pile of scraps by my machine and I am determined to get a crib quilt done – that is 16 snails for a finished quilt of 46 1/2 inch square.  If you would like to join in the fun you can find the pattern for sale on Craftsy…. click here to buy it.   If you would like to find out more about the sew along check out Gnome Angels website here

When I was trying to choose my colour scheme I spent ages searching through the hashtag for the Sew Along.  There are some amazing quilts being made with this pattern so check out #gardensnailquilt on Instagram for some great inspiration.

Another low volume finish…

In my work room I have a box that I throw all my low volume scraps into as I am working.  This box fills up pretty quickly, not surprisingly with all the quilts I have my hands in/on and every time it gets to the point where it is over flowing I make a Scrap Vortex quilt…

low volume scrap vortex 2

This is my second one of these quilts I have made and I really do love how they turn out…. you can see my first version here… and with both these quilts I have struggled to get good photos.

quilt detail 3

they really are just an excuse for me to throw in as much fussy cutting goodness as I can… which makes for the best game of I spy…

quilt detail 4

plus this was a fun break for me from the complex butterfly blocks I have been making….

quilt detail 2

This finished quilt is already in the hands of the local PICU for some kid to snuggle under.

Quilt Details:

Block:  12 inch Scrap Vortex technique by Crazy Mom Quilts
Fabric:  Various low volume scraps
Finished quilt size:  48 x 60 inches

Back with a block…

After a flurry of online activity, life once again got in the way of blogging but I am back again, this time with a block pattern for my Do Good Stitches circle.  You see in June I am the designated quilter which means I pick the colour scheme and block for my fellow DGS peeps to work with…

I never make this decision easily… I always ‘um and ah’ between a couple of block options… sometimes making test blocks to see what my idea looks like.   This month I settled on the colour scheme quickly…

CW_MoodBoardMonday_BluesGreens

and pulled these fabrics to match from my stash….

fabric pull

but struggled to pin down what sort of block I wanted to make.  I finally settled on a simple 12 inch block which Is called a Double T and dates back to 1882 I believe e…

finished T block

To make one block you will need to cut:

cutting instructions

This 12 inch block uses two different types of block components – flying geese and half square triangles (HST).  So lets start with the HST…

For these components you will need the two white 5 inch squares and the two green 5 inch squares.

mark down center

Using a fabric marker (I use my trusty Frixon marker) mark a diagonal line down the center of both the white squares..

Place one white square and one green square pattern side together and then sew down both sides of the center line using a scant quarter inch…

sew down each side

Then cut down that center line using your rotary cutter…

cut down drawn line

You now have two half square triangle pieces….  iron the HSTs with the seams open.

trim block

Then trim your ironed HST to 4 1/2 inches square.  For each block you will need 4 half square triangle components.

Next component is the flying geese…and you can make these one of two ways – either using traditional piecing or paper piecing…  the cutting instructions above are for the traditional pieced version.  If you are paper piecing you can cut a little more generously – say about 1/4 inch more on all the geese pieces.

Lets start with the traditional version…. first mark up all of the 2 1/2 inch squares with the same diagonal line you used in the HSTs.

geese corners

Place the small green squares pattern side down on the corner of your white triangle pieces.  Sew down your diagonal line…

Trim the excess corner fabric off your rectangle and press the green corner up on your block, pressing your seams open…

geese corner 2

Place the second 2 1/2 inch square on the opposite side of your rectangle piece and again sew down the marked line, trim and press seams open.  You will need to make two of these geese blocks for each flying geese component…

flying geese unit

If you would like to use paper piecing to make these components you can download the pattern for these 4 1/2 inch flying geese here… Flying Geese components

paper piecing option

Once you have made your block components lay your block out like this….

block components

I then sew the components together in rows…. and press the seams to the side, making sure that the bulky side of the geese is laying flat.

block rows

I then sew the rows together and viola you have a block…. and in a month or so I should have a collection of blocks from my fellow Do Good Stitches peeps which will become a pretty quilt top.

On a roll….

Another Friday finish for you…and this week is a darling little baby quilt I made using some small wonky star blocks I had floating around…

finished small wonky star quilt

Usually when I make wonky star quilts I use 5 inch squares to make the stars , but for this quilt I used my stash of 3 inch squares and a pile of scrap pieces to make 8 inch (unfinished) stars.

small star detail 2

Actually these stars had been sitting in my WIP pile for a while when I dug them up and started playing… I did not want to make any more stars so instead I used a pile of low volume scraps to play with the star layout.

small wonky star detail

I tried to lay the stars out randomly and used filler pieces – mainly 3 inch squares, 3 x 5 1/2 inch and 3 x 8 inch strips to fill in the gaps.  I wanted the background to be just as scrappy as the stars so I did not use any really big low volume pieces.

small star detail

The scrappy background also gave me more opportunities for fussy cutting, allowing me to cram in even more novelty prints (have you spotted the squirrels yet!).

My binding choice was a little different from usual with this quilt too… I went with low volume soft colours to frame the quilt instead of my usual wonky star binding – navy blue or scrappy brights.  I liked how this choice lets the stars jump off the quilt instead of containing them inside a frame.

quilting detail

The wonderful free motion quilting on this piece was done by my friend Michelle of Mariposa Quilting.  I was so pleased this quilt was not ruined by my clumsy straight line quilting.

Once washed this quilt will head off to the our local Pediatric Intensive Care unit where it will hopefully be used for a couple of good games of I Spy….

An emotional finish…

One of the quilts that I recently finished up was one that had been languishing in the WIP pile not because I was bored with it but because I was not emotional ready to deal with finishing it.

The quilt was started in 2015 while I was recovering from surgery after an ectopic pregnancy.  For the last year or so I was not ready to deal with finishing the quilt up… then one day I looked at the quilt top and decided it was time.  I bundled it up and sent it to my friend Kazumi to finish up…

finished star cross quilt 2

The quilt top was made using a paper piecing pattern that I designed…and making the top was a slow and deliberate process for me as I healed.  If you are interested in reading more or using the pattern you can follow the links to my earlier posts.

star cross quilt detail 3

This quilt is our new couch quilt and my new comfort quilt.  I have not kept many of my quilts but this one will be treasured.  I look at it and see all the pain but also all the strength it took to keep going.

cross star quilt detail 2

I also see lots of little treasured bits of my stash, including some fabrics which were bought decades ago when I started quilting.

cross star quilt detail

I am really proud of this quilt… it is not my most creative masterpiece -my most creative quilt to date is my Michael Miller challenge quilt I think – but as I made this quilt piece by tiny piece I stitched myself back together.  I am proud of that.

quilt wrangler

And I could not have done any of it without the support of my wonderful quilt holder and partner in crime.  Thank you Mr Wombat.